November 2013

THE UNCONSCIOUS, Part Two

As previously discussed, Sam Harris suggested swapping our situations with other people by substituting atom-for-atom, while I proposed the Cherokee way as being most effective, that is, by walking in that person’s moccasins.  This difference of opinion aims at the same thing and seems benign enough, but to inquiring minds it points to widely differing world views.  Are we, as people, a product of experiences or of atoms?

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What Psychology Isn't

The conclusion to my previous comment on training is my introduction to the next point of discussion. The focus now is on what occurs in our experience that is purely psychological, but is not even considered in psychological training or anything having to do with mental health.

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What's For Dinner?

A counselor friend about my age, which is to say near retirement, offered that he was thinking of going for his Ph.D. I didn’t ask the reason. I didn’t need to. I knew the thought was what inevitably happens to a person who completes a Master’s level program, makes a decent living, and looks at the more educated competition in the mental health field only to realize that the competition doesn’t have anything in the way of brains that the thinker hasn’t got. There is no doubt that that assessment of brain distribution is entirely correct.

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Now That We Are Thoroughly Lost

The best way to understand psychological research and research in general is as a paradigm for living. When my committee chair said that he didn’t believe in the Scientist Practitioner model what he was saying was that he was a pure researcher and he did not thinking that research should enrich the mental health practitioner nor should the practice of mental health therapy be considered as enriching or giving guidance to research. So, you might ask, what is the use of this kind of research and why should anyone living in the real world be interested?

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